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Timber Wolf

International Dog Biscuit Appreciation Day

By Student Life

During the height of the Roman Empire, low-quality bread, deemed “unfit for human consumption,” was referred to as “dog bread” and fed to stray and companion dogs. Over the centuries, it transformed into the treats we give our own pooches today.

Of note in this transformation from rotten bread to fine treat, is James Spratt of Cincinnati, who in the mid-19th Century, traveled to England and observed dogs scavenging on hardtack (the cracker-like rations made to sustain soldiers).  He quickly came up with a prototype biscuit made of meat, grains, and vegetables that would provide hunting dogs, of the country gentlemen, the extra energy they needed for a day in the field.  Spratt patented the idea and marketed his “Meat Fibrine Dog Cakes,” and they eventually made their way to the States7.

A few years later, an American inventor named Carleton Ellis, was asked by a slaughterhouse to come up with a use for “waster milk,” so he devised the milk-based biscuit we have all heard of and that dog’s love, and put the finishing touch on it by shaping it into a bone. The F.H. Bennett Biscuit Company of New York then began selling the biscuits they called “Malatoid” until the product name was changed to “Milk-Bone.” Nabisco Biscuit Company eventually acquired these bone-shaped treats and dominated the market for the next decade or more until they were purchased by the National Biscuit Company (aka Nabisco)8.

 

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Source: MetLife

U.S. flag Raised at Iwo Jima 1945

By Student Life

The Battle of Iwo Jima (19 February – 26 March 1945) was a major battle in which the United States Marine Corps and United States Navy landed on and eventually captured the island of Iwo Jima from the Imperial Japanese Army (IJA) during World War II. The American invasion, designated Operation Detachment, had the purpose of capturing the island with its two airfields: South Field and Central Field.

The Japanese Army positions on the island were heavily fortified, with a dense network of bunkers, hidden artillery positions, and 18 km (11 mi) of tunnels.[e] The American ground forces were supported by extensive naval artillery and had complete air supremacy provided by U.S. Navy and Marine Corps aviators throughout the battle.[11] The five-week battle saw some of the fiercest and bloodiest fighting of the Pacific War.

The Japanese combat deaths numbered three times the number of American deaths, but uniquely among Pacific War Marine battles, the American total casualties (dead and wounded) exceeded those of the Japanese.[12] Of the 21,000 Japanese soldiers on Iwo Jima at the beginning of the battle, only 216 were taken prisoner, some of whom were captured only because they had been knocked unconscious or otherwise disabled.[f] Most of the remainder were killed in action, but it has been estimated that as many as 3,000 continued to resist within the various cave systems for many days afterwards until they eventually succumbed to their injuries or surrendered weeks later.[2][9]

Despite the bloody fighting and severe casualties on both sides, the American victory was assured from the start. Overwhelming American superiority in numbers and arms as well as complete air supremacy—coupled with the impossibility of Japanese retreat or reinforcement, as well as sparse food and supplies—permitted no plausible circumstance in which the Japanese could have ultimately won the battle.[13]

The action was controversial, with retired Chief of Naval Operations William V. Pratt stating that the island was useless to the Army as a staging base and useless to the Navy as a fleet base.[14] The Japanese continued to have early-warning radar from Rota island, which was never invaded,[15] and the captured air field was barely used. Experiences with previous Pacific island battles suggested that the island would be well defended, and thus casualties would be significant.

Joe Rosenthal‘s Associated Press photograph of the raising of the U.S. flag at the top of the 169 m (554 ft) Mount Suribachi by six U.S. Marines became an iconic image of the battle and the American war effort in the Pacific.[16]

 

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Source: Wikipedia

President’s Day

By Student Life

Presidents’ Day, officially Washington’s Birthday, is a holiday in the United States celebrated on the third Monday of February to honor all persons who served in the office of president of the United States and a federal holiday specifically honoring George Washington, who led the Continental Army to victory in the American Revolutionary War, presided at the Constitutional Convention of 1787, and was the first president of the United States.

The day is a state holiday in most states, with official names including Washington’s Birthday, Presidents’ Day, President’s Day, Presidents Day, and Washington’s and Lincoln’s Birthday.[1] The various states use 15 different names. Depending upon the specific law, the state holiday may officially celebrate Washington alone, Washington and Lincoln, or some other combination of U.S. presidents (such as Washington and Thomas Jefferson, who was born in April).[1]

Washington’s Birthday was celebrated on February 22 from 1879 until 1971, when the Uniform Monday Holiday Act moved it to the third Monday in February, which can occur from February 15 to the 21st.[2] The day eventually also became known as Presidents’ Day[3] (though the placement of the apostrophe, if any, varies) and is most often an occasion to remember all U.S. presidents, or to honor Abraham Lincoln‘s and Washington’s birthdays together.[1]

 

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Nylon is invented 1935

By Student Life

Wallace Carothers was 32 years old when he was appointed director of Du Pont Corporation’s research center. He had studied and taught organic chemistry before that, with a specialization in polymers, molecules composed of long chains of repeating units of atoms. Polymers were little-understood molecules when Carothers began his work. He made major contributions to the understanding of their structure and of polymerization, how these long chain molecules form.

Du Pont’s goal was basic research with possible industrial applications, especially in the field of artificial materials. Carothers’ team first investigated the acetylene family of chemicals. He published papers and obtained patents, and in 1931, Du Pont started to manufacture neoprene, a synthetic rubber (commonly used in wetsuits) created by Carothers’ lab.

The search was on for a synthetic fiber. By 1934, Carothers had a promising development: He combined the chemicals amine, hexamethylene diamine, and adipic acid. It created fibers! But they were weak. They had formed by the polymerizing process known as a condensation reaction, in which individual molecules join together, with water as a byproduct. Carothers’ breakthrough came when he realized the water produced by the reaction was dropping back into the mixture and getting in the way of more polymers forming. He adjusted his equipment so that the water was distilled and removed from the system. It worked!

Carothers drew out fibers that were long, strong, and very elastic. Du Pont named this product nylon. The chemists called it Nylon 66 because the adipic acid and hexamethylene diamine each contain 6 carbon atoms per molecule. Each molecule consisted of 100 or more repeating units of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen atoms, strung in a chain. A filament of nylon may have a million or more molecules, each taking some of the strain when the filament is stretched.

It was exactly what Du Pont had hoped for, and nylon was patented in 1935. It hit the markets in 1939 and was an instant hit, especially as a replacement for silk in hosiery. In fact, before long “nylons” and “stockings” were synonyms in everyday speech. Carothers did not see the widespread application of his work — in consumer goods such as toothbrushes, fishing lines, and lingerie, or in special uses such as surgical thread, parachutes, or pipes — nor the powerful effect it had in launching a whole era of synthetics. He died in April, 1937.

Archaeologist opens tomb of King Tut

By Student Life

On February 16, 1923, in Thebes, Egypt, English archaeologist Howard Carter enters the sealed burial chamber of the ancient Egyptian ruler King Tutankhamen.

Because the ancient Egyptians saw their pharaohs as gods, they carefully preserved their bodies after death, burying them in elaborate tombs containing rich treasures to accompany the rulers into the afterlife. In the 19th century, archeologists from all over the world flocked to Egypt, where they uncovered a number of these tombs. Many had long ago been broken into by robbers and stripped of their riches.

When Carter arrived in Egypt in 1891, he became convinced there was at least one undiscovered tomb–that of the little known Tutankhamen, or King Tut, who lived around 1400 B.C. and died when he was still a teenager. Backed by a rich Brit, Lord Carnarvon, Carter searched for five years without success. In early 1922, Lord Carnarvon wanted to call off the search, but Carter convinced him to hold on one more year.

In November 1922, the wait paid off, when Carter’s team found steps hidden in the debris near the entrance of another tomb. The steps led to an ancient sealed doorway bearing the name Tutankhamen. When Carter and Lord Carnarvon entered the tomb’s interior chambers on November 26, they were thrilled to find it virtually intact, with its treasures untouched after more than 3,000 years. The men began exploring the four rooms of the tomb, and on February 16, 1923, under the watchful eyes of a number of important officials, Carter opened the door to the last chamber.

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The Lil’ Shopper’s Shoppe®

By Student Life
The Lil’ Shopper’s Shoppe® offers only high quality holiday gifts priced right for kids shopping. Many of the gifts are designed from input by PTA & PTO volunteers, teachers and students. There’s something here for everyone! There are over 110 high quality holiday gift items priced within a child’s budget–from pocket change to $10.00, with most gifts under $3. You’ll find something here for everyone on a child’s list: Mom, Dad, Brothers, Sisters, Grandparents, Teachers, Special Friends and Pets.

2021-2022 Lady Timberwolves Basketball Schedule

By Student Life

 

11/09/21- Dillard Academy (MS) -5:00PM (AWAY)

11/16/21- Cardinal Charter (MS)- 4:30 PM (AWAY)

11/19/21- Ascend Leadership Academy (JV)- 5:30 PM (AWAY)

11/30/21- Berean Baptist Academy (MS) – 4:00 PM (AWAY)

12/07/21- KIPP Durham (MS)- 4:30 PM (HOME)

12/09/21- Healthy Start Academy (MS)- 4:30 PM (HOME)

12/14/21-Cardinal Charter (MS)- 4:30 PM (HOME)

12/16/21-Riverside Christian Academy (JV)- 4:30 PM (HOME)

12/17/21- Trinity Christian (MS)-4:30PM (HOME)

01/11/22- Dillard Academy (MS)- 4:30 PM (HOME)

01/14/22- Riverside Christian Academy (JV)- 6:30 PM (AWAY)

01/21/22- Ascend Leadership Academy (JV)- 6:00 PM (HOME)

01/24/22- KIPP Durham (MS)-4:30PM (AWAY)

01/28/22- TBA(MS)-4:30PM (HOME)

02/03/22- Healthy Start Academy (MS)- 4:30 PM (AWAY)

02/08/22- New Life Christian Academy (JV)- 4:30 PM (AWAY)

 

Game Day Addresses

Ascend Leadership Academy

283 Harvey Faulk Rd

Sanford, NC 27332

 

Dillard Academy

W.A. Foster Center

1012 S John St.

Goldsboro, NC 27530

 

KIPP Durham

TBA

 

Cardinal Charter

1020 St Charles Pl

 Cary, NC 27513

 

Riverside Christian Academy

Highland Presbyterian Church

111 Highland Ave.

 Fayetteville, NC 28305

 

New Life Christian Academy

1420 Hoke Loop Rd.

Fayetteville, NC 28314

2021-2022 Timberwolves Basketball Schedule

By Student Life

11/09/21- Dillard Academy (MS) -6:30PM (AWAY)

11/16/21- Cardinal Charter (MS)- 5:30 PM (AWAY)

11/19/21- Ascend Leadership Academy (MS/JV)- 4:00 PM/7:00 PM (AWAY)

11/30/21- Berean Baptist Academy (MS)- 5:00 PM (AWAY)

12/07/21- KIPP Durham (MS)- 6:00 PM (HOME)

12/09/21- Healthy Start Academy (MS)-5:30PM (HOME)

12/14/21-Cardinal Charter (MS)- 5:30 PM (HOME)

12/16/21-Riverside Christian Academy (JV)- 5:30 PM (HOME)

12/17/21- Trinity Christian (MS/JV)- 5:30 PM/6:30 PM (HOME)

01/11/22- Dillard Academy (MS)- 5:30 PM (HOME)

01/14/22- Riverside Christian Academy (JV)- 7:30 PM (AWAY)

01/19/22- Chatham Charter (JV)- 4:30 PM (AWAY)

01/21/22- Ascend Leadership Academy- (MS/ JV)- 5:00PM/ 7:00PM (HOME)

01/24/22- KIPP Durham (MS)-6:00PM (AWAY)

01/28/22- TBA (MS)-5:30PM (HOME)

02/03/22- Healthy Start Academy-(MS)- 5:30 PM (AWAY)

02/04/22- Chatham Charter (JV)- 4:30 PM (HOME)

Game Day Addresses

Ascend Leadership Academy

283 Harvey Faulk Rd

Sanford, NC 27332

 

Dillard Academy

W.A. Foster Center

1012 S John St.

Goldsboro, NC 27530

 

KIPP Durham

TBA

 

Cardinal Charter

1020 St Charles Pl

 Cary, NC 27513

 

Chatham Charter

2200 Hamp Stone Rd.

 Siler City, NC 27344

 

Riverside Christian Academy

Highland Presbyterian Church

111 Highland Ave.

 Fayetteville, NC 28305

Pep Squad Tryouts

By Student Life

Pep Squad Tryouts

Date: November 6, 2021
Time: 10 am – 12 pm
Location: Alpha Academy Gymnasium

Open To Girls in 4th to 12th Grade
Participants should bring water, a mask, and wear workout attire.

For more information contact
Ms. Gidrey
sgidrey@alphaacademy.net

 

 

 

 

Public Notice

By Student Life
PUBLIC NOTICE

The Alpha Academy RETURN TO IN-PERSON LEARNING PLAN is posted for public comment for a period of 30 days from October 13, 2021, through November 12, 2021.

A copy of the Plan can be viewed at the following links below:

Public comments will be received on the following link: https://forms.gle/NMTrHZyywJ5g8PZEA

Comments can be submitted in writing by U.S. Mail to:
Alpha Academy
Public Comments
8030 Raeford Road
Fayetteville, NC 28304